Slate Roof Pros & Cons | Slate Roof Tile Benefits

History of Slate Roofs

Slate roofs are one of the oldest types of roofing. They have been around for about 5,000 years and were used to protect homes in ancient Rome. Slate roofs are made up of a natural rock that is mined from quarries all over the world.

The popularity of slate roofs have decreased of late since they can be expensive to install and repair, but there are still many benefits that make them worth consideration if you're looking for a new roof.

Slate Roof Benefits

Slate roofs are a popular choice for homeowners. They have an elegant look, they last a long time, and they are easy to maintain.

Ease of Repair

Slate roofs are easier to repair than other roof types due to their composition. You can simply replace individual tiles that have been damaged, rather than the entire roof structure.

Water-Resistance

Slate roofs have a low moisture absorption rate, which means that they will be less likely to leak or rot, and you'll have fewer repairs over time.

Fire-Resistance

There are a lot of benefits to a slate roof. Slate is fire-resistant as well, so if your building material is flammable, it can help you to avoid any accidents.

Aging

Slate puts asphalt shingles to shame in terms of longevity. A properly installed and well-maintained slate roof can last several decades, with the best case scenario being 100 years. Put another way, a good slate roof is something your grandkids may inherit.

Slate Roof Drawbacks

The most obvious downside to using slate for your roof is the cost. However, there are a few other reasons you may want to choose an alternative roofing material.

The Expense of a Slate Roof

Slate roofs are expensive to install and can be even more expensive to repair. Slate is mined from quarries all over the world, which means handling transportation costs and increased shipping costs. In addition, slate roof tiles must be laid individually rather than in sheets.

The Fragility & Durability of a Slate Roofing Tile

A slate roofing tile can withstand the punishment of a harsh New England weather. It's a rock after all. However, it can quickly become an expensive potato chip if you have someone up on the roof who doesn't know what they're doing. That includes you, the homeowner.

Replacing Individual Slate Tiles

You can't just order a matched slate tile like you can a gallon of paint at Sherwin Williams. Slate isn't sold that way. Given the longevity of a good slate roof, you could find that some inconsistencies of color and non-uniformity arises over time. While this is the least concerning of the cons of having a slate roof installed, it should still be noted.

The Weight of Slate

Back to the idea of slate being a rock. As a roofing material, it is among the heaviest offered on the market. A professional roofing contractor will make

Alternatives to a Slate Roof Installation

Synthetic slate roofs have come a long way. They offered increased durability, reduced cost, color optionality, reduced weight and more.